Learning about the devastation of the Chernobyl disaster

May 10 2016

STUDENTS from all year groups at King’s Oak Academy gathered on the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster to hear first hand of the devastation caused by the world's worst nuclear accident.

Marina Harodnaya with King’s Oak Academy students

STUDENTS from all year groups at King’s Oak Academy gathered on the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster to hear first hand of the devastation caused by the world's worst nuclear accident.
Marina Harodnaya, who is from Belarus and lived through the disaster, spoke to the 160 students, describing how a failed experiment caused a nuclear power plant to blow up on April 26, 1986.
During the accident, 31 people died but the long-term effects, including cancer, weakened immune system and deformities, exist to this day.
Marina told students how everyday life is affected by what happened 30 years ago and explained how her links to Bristol were forged when she visited the city for a respite holiday in 1998.
Marina, who is married with a daughter, is visiting the area to work with the Bristol link of the charity Chernobyl Children’s Life Line, which was formed with the aim of helping the children affected by offering them some relief from the relentless bombardment of radiation.
The charity organises visits to Bristol as a month’s respite holiday here helps to boost their immune system by providing plenty of nourishing, uncontaminated food and clean fresh air.
Around 500,000 children in Belarus are classified as at ‘high risk’ by the World Health Organisation.
Simon Jones, assistant principal at King’s Oak Academy said: “This was a once in a lifetime opportunity for our students to hear first-hand of the disaster that occurred in Chernobyl.
"Wherever possible at King’s Oak will like to bring the real world into the academy and this was a unique opportunity for students to meet someone who lived through the biggest nuclear disaster in history.”